Skip to main content
Request Appointment
Moshe-Slides-v3-6
Moshe-Slides-v3-2
Home » Scleral » Kerataconus and Coronavirus

Kerataconus and Coronavirus

Middle Aged Couple Multifocal Contacts

Keratoconus is an eye disease affecting the cornea.  The cornea is the clear front part of the eye that is responsible for bending light onto the retina.  The retina receives that information and sends it to the brain.  In Keratoconus the cornea becomes thin and distorted, and becomes a cone-like shape, hence the term Kerato-Conus. This then causes blurred vision, glare, and a halo affect around lights.

  • Some of the choices to help people with Keratoconus are:
  • Eyeglasses or soft contact lenses for those who have a mild or moderate condition.
  • Scleral lenses that vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera, the white part of the eye.
  • Some benefit from corneal cross linking that helps make the cornea more firm, but it does not correct vision or help people see clearly. It’s purpose is to prevent the progression of the keratoconus.
  • In some cases, a corneal transplant is needed.

Hygiene for Scleral-Lens Wearers in the Coronavirus Era

As always, hygiene is paramount when you handle and wear and contact lenses and that goes for scleral lenses as well.  Washing your hands thoroughly before touching the lenses is essential.  Cleaning and rinsing the lenses with recommended solutions is equally important.

Wearing scleral lenses and other contact lenses during the COVID pandemic is safe, and it has the benefit of eyeglasses not fogging up while you wear a mask.

Consider taking these added preventative steps:

  • Use disinfectant wipes to clean the counters and other surfaces where you place the scleral-lens cases and solutions. This includes disinfecting the cases and containers of solutions before using.
  • Wash your hands before touching your eyes or removing your lenses.
  • Try not to touch your eyes or face.

We, at Family Eye Care in Old Bridge, NJ, treat patients with Keratoconus, Pellucid Marginal Degeneration, post-corneal transplant, post cross-linking, and after LASIK surgeries that have had less than the best outcomes.

We treat patients from all the surrounding towns:  Aberdeen, East Brunswick, Manalapan, Matawan, Marlboro, Monroe, Parlin. Sayreville, South Amboy, South River, Spotswood, Lawrence Harbor, Cliffwood Beach, and patients throughout New Jersey.

References: