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9 Eye-Healthy Habits for Computer Users

As Covid-19 kept all of us homebound for long periods, the gaming industry grew by leaps and bounds. Then, even when countries began to reopen and jumpstart their economy, nobody abandoned their video games. In fact, sales of video games experienced a 35% jump.

Impact of Gaming on Eye Health

What are some of the effects of this rising role of gaming in our lifestyle? It translates directly into increased screen time, which our optometrist near you points out is linked to a variety of negative effects on eye health. For some of us, the digital era has turned our days into an endless view of screens. As a result, many people suffer the symptoms of computer vision syndrome, such as:

  • Less blinking, leading to dry eyes
  • Blurry vision
  • Eye irritation, burning
  • Eye fatigue and strain
  • Headaches

While it’s unlikely that excessive screen time can cause irreversible damage to your eyes, dry eye syndrome and eye strain can worsen gradually – leading to painful vision and a decreased quality of life.

How to Preserve Healthy Vision with Computer Use

To help keep your vision healthy, despite all the long periods spent at a computer, the eye doctor near you recommends the following habits:

  1. The 20-20-20 Rule Instead of staring for hours on end at a computer screen, take regular breaks to rest your eyes. Follow this rule – every 20 minutes, move your eyes to look at an object 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Set Up Good Lighting Glare and other visual disturbances can make it harder to read text, which can lead to eye strain. By angling your monitor away from light sources and windows, you can eliminate glare from the screen.
  3. Adjust Screen Brightness When adjusting the lighting in your office or home is too tricky, change the monitor’s brightness instead. Rule of thumb – make it as bright as the room you are in.
  4. Take Eye Health Vitamins Supplements such as omega-3 fatty acids are a great addition to your eye care routine, helping to fortify your eyes against problems.
  5. Block Blue Light You can wear specialized blue light glasses to shield your eyes from harmful blue light emitted by digital devices, or install a blue light filter on your digital screen. Not only will these protective devices help promote quality eye health, but they can also help you sleep better at night.
  6. Eat Nutritiously A healthy, balanced diet will keep your body at its peak and improve vision to boot. Some good food choices include cold-water fish, like salmon, tuna and sardines, nuts, eggs, legumes, whole grains, berries, leafy greens, and citrus fruits.
  7. Increase Font Size A small font size can cause you to squint and hunch over to see the screen clearly. By enlarging the font, you can avoid the discomfort caused by this position.
  8. Sleep Enough Not getting enough sleep can lead to eye fatigue, which interferes with your everyday life and productivity.
  9. Visit Our Eye Clinic Near You for Regular Eye Exams Getting your eyes checked is essential for proper eye health. It’s the only reliable way to detect or rule out an eye disease or condition that requires early treatment.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Astigmatism, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at Family Eye Care eye clinic near you in Old Bridge, New Jersey to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 732-393-8636

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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  • Why do I need to have my eyes examined by an Optometrist if the nurse at my last physical exam says I can see 20/20?

    The nurse performed a “sight test”, when you come to see your Optometrist we perform an “Eye Exam”. A “sight test” only measures if you can see 20/20. An “Eye Exam” measures all aspects of visual function: sight (or visual acuity), binocular vision function (the ability of the eyes to work together), visual pathway integrity, and the overall health of your eyes. Seeing 20/20 is an important part of the overall function of your eyes; however, just because you can see 20/20 does not necessarily mean your eyes are 100% healthy. There are many conditions that exist in which someone can still see 20/20. To name just a few examples: Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma, and even Retinal tears or detachments (if the macula is unaffected). I recommend having a full eye exam every 1-2 years, even if you are in good health and feel like you don’t need glasses.

  • Does reading my smartphone or tablet in the dark damage my eyes?

    Reading from a tablet or smartphone in the dark is okay for your eyes, as long as this is not for a long period of time. There is good lighting from these devices, with good contrast. There is, however, the blue light emitted from these devices. Blue light is a short wavelength light, with high energy that may cause damage to the structures of the eye if exposed for a long period of time. As well, studies have shown this blue light can disrupt melatonin production which is required for a healthy sleep cycle. Doctors of Optometry recommend limiting screen use during the last hour before bedtime.

  • What is blue light and why is it dangerous?

    Blue light is part of visible light and close to UV on the light spectrum. It is naturally produced by the sun, used in fluorescent light bulbs and emitted by LED screens on computer monitors, tablets, and smartphones. The eyes’ natural filters do not block blue light and chronic exposure can cause age-related macular degeneration. Evidence also shows that blue light exposure can lead to sleep problems.’

  • My eyes are always burning and tired, what is causing this and what can I do about it?

    These are often signs of dry eye syndrome, a very common condition that affects many people over time. Women are generally more prone to developing these symptoms and aging is often a cause as well. Dryness of our eyes is often due to a decrease in the oil production in our eyelid glands which causes the surface of the eye to become irritated. Certain medications and health issues can also contribute to dryness. There is no true cure for dryness but many treatments are available such as the use of artificial tears, nutritional supplements incorporating Omega 3, prescription medications such as Restasis, and eyelid hygiene. No single treatment works for every individual so we customize treatments for each person and their specific condition.

What’s The Link Between Obesity And Eye Disease?

People who are obese are at higher risk of developing some sight-threatening eye conditions and diseases. Read on to discover why, and how we can help.

It is well documented that obesity impacts health in numerous ways, from a higher incidence of diabetes to cardiovascular disease. What many people don’t know is obesity’s negative effect on vision and eye health. Speak with our Eye care professionals at Family Eye Care about any concerns you may have about your eye health or vision.

There is increasing evidence that obese individuals have a greater risk of developing serious, sight-threatening eye diseases.

Researchers at the Goldschleger Eye Institute at the Sheba Medical Center found a consistent link between obesity and the development of age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy.

The researchers noted that the public is largely unaware of this link, despite the evidence. If more people knew about the risk, they said, it might motivate them to try to shed some extra weight.

How Does Obesity Impact The Eyes?

A body mass index (BMI) of 25-30 is considered overweight and any BMI over 30 is considered obese. Recent studies indicate that a handful of ocular diseases can now be added to the list of medical conditions associated with an elevated BMI.

Diabetic retinopathy, floppy eyelid syndrome, retinal vein occlusions, stroke-related vision loss, and age-related macular degeneration are all risk factors of obesity.

While the cause is not yet certain, researchers believe this may be due to the peripheral artery disease prevalent among people who are obese. When the tiny blood vessels around the eyes are compromised, they may have trouble delivering oxygen and other nutrients to the eye area.

Obesity is also a risk factor for developing cataracts (the clouding of the eye’s natural lens). Poor nutrition or high blood sugar levels, which are commonly found in people with obesity, may contribute to the cloudiness.

Although obesity may contribute to cataract formation, losing weight may not significantly reduce the risk of developing them, partly because cataracts are also a common consequence of aging, whatever one’s weight.

Additionally, morbid obesity is associated with higher inner eye pressure, which may increase one’s risk of glaucoma and glaucomatous optic neuropathy — leading causes of vision loss and blindness. Morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI of 40 or above, or 35 and above with health conditions like high blood pressure or diabetes.

Stay Active, Healthy, and Have Regular Eye Exams

An active lifestyle and a nutritious diet can help you maintain a healthy weight and improve overall physical and eye health. Try to include several key nutrients into your diets, such as vitamins C and E, zeaxanthin, omega-3, zinc, and lutein, as they may help delay or prevent certain eye diseases.

While a balanced diet and regular exercise significantly increase your chance of living a healthy life, it’s also crucial to have regular eye exams. A comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Moshe Roth can help detect the onset of ocular disease and ensure the earliest and most effective treatment to preserve your gift of sight.

Don’t hesitate to call Family Eye Care in Old Bridge with any questions or concerns regarding your vision or eye health — we’re here for you.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Astigmatism, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at Family Eye Care eye clinic near you in Old Bridge, New Jersey to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 732-393-8636

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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  • Is it possible to prevent Macular Degeneration?

    Doctors aren’t sure how to prevent macular degeneration. Research suggests that ultraviolet light (and possibly blue light) factors into the problem, so sunglasses could be very beneficial.

  • My doctor says I have a cataract, but he wants to wait a while before removing it. Why?’

    A cataract usually starts very small and practically unnoticeable but grows gradually larger and cloudier. Your doctor is probably waiting until the cataract interferes significantly with your vision and your lifestyle. You need to continue to visit your eye doctor regularly so the cataract’s progress is monitored. Some cataracts never really reach the stage where they should be removed. If your cataract is interfering with your vision to the point where it is unsafe to drive, or doing everyday tasks is difficult, then it’s time to discuss surgery with your doctor.

  • What exactly is glaucoma?

    Glaucoma is a condition in which the eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP) is too high. This means that your eye has too much aqueous humor in it, either because it produced too much, or because it’s not draining properly. Other symptoms are optic nerve damage and vision loss. Glaucoma is a silent disease that robs the patient of their peripheral vision. Early detection is very important.

  • What is diabetic retinopathy?’

    Doctors aren’t sure how to prevent macular degeneration. Research suggests that ultraviolet light (and possibly blue light) factors into the problem, so sunglasses could be very beneficial.

Computer learning and vision problems

Unfortunately because of COVID-19, we’re seeing a lot of our kids spend an enormous amount of time in front of a computer.

This has bad consequences not just for adults that have eye fatigue and strain, but especially in younger children who are still developing their vision. Our visual system needs to be actively involved in using all our space. Not just our close distances like reading and computers, but also moving outside in an infinite space setting like a playground.

Our visual system uses being outdoors to kind of recalibrate, and have good functional focusing ability. Studies show that children who are indoors a lot like in China tend to have higher degrees of myopia or nearsightedness.

The ability to be outside, to play, and have sports is very important for the visual system.

Here are a couple of things we can recommend for your child or young adult that might be spending a lot of time in front of the screen.

First of all, I would suggest the 20-20-20 rule.

Every 20 minutes, look away from the screen, hopefully, 20 feet or more.

Looking outside a window is ideal. Relax your eyes for about 20 seconds. This will be a visual break. If your teacher doesn’t like it, tell them your eye doctor is recommending this. You can still listen to what your teacher is saying, however, you should relax your focus periodically.

Also, make sure that when you are reading or writing that you are no closer than the Harmon distance. The Harmon distance is between knuckle and elbow. If you see your child getting closer and closer to their work, check their Harmon distance and move them back. This is very effective when dealing with younger children. I did this with my daughter when she was 4, and she would check her Harmon distance by putting her elbow on the desk and backing her head up to her knuckles. If you see the children are still doing this a lot, have them checked by a developmental optometrist because, very often, a low plus lens can help the child relax their focus.

You can also make sure that if your child is experiencing eye pain, strain, discomfort, double vision or blur, that you get them in to see their developmental optometrist. We can prescribe glasses for their best comfort at near. We want to preserve our vision & our children’s vision & keep our nation strong despite this pandemic.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Astigmatism, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at Family Eye Care eye clinic near you in Old Bridge, New Jersey to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 732-393-8636

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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  • My child had a vision exam at my Paediatrician, why do I need to come to the eye doctor?

    Vision screening programs are intended to help identify children or adults who may have undetected vision problems and refer them for further evaluation. However, they can’t be relied on to provide the same results as a comprehensive eye and vision examination. Vision screening programs are intended to help identify children or adults who may have undetected vision problems and refer them for further evaluation. Screenings can take many forms. Often schools provide periodic vision screenings for their students. A pediatrician or other primary care physician may do a vision screening as part of a school physical. When applying for a driver’s license, chances are your vision will be screened. Many times vision screenings are part of local health fairs put on by hospitals, social service agencies or fraternal groups like the Lions and Elks Clubs. While vision screenings can uncover some individuals with vision problems, they can miss more than they find. This is a major concern about vision screening programs. Current vision screening methods cannot be relied upon to effectively identify individuals in need of vision care. In some cases, vision screening may actually serve as an unnecessary barrier to an early diagnosis of vision problems. They can create a false sense of security for those individuals who “pass” the screening, but who actually have a vision problem, thereby delaying further examination and treatment. Undetected and untreated vision problems can interfere with a child’s ability to learn in school and participation in sports or with an adult’s ability to do their job or to drive safely. The earlier a vision problem is diagnosed and treated, the less it will impact an individual’s quality of life.

  • I have heard about blue light being a concern as well. Can you talk a little bit about this and what it means for protecting your eyes?

    Recently, the optical community has found that blue light can also cause long-term damage to the eye. It has been found that overexposure to blue light over time can lead to macular degeneration. To help protect our eyes from these rays, a new coating has been found to block out this blue light. Anti-reflective or anti-glare coating could be a term that is familiar to you. Labs have found a way for these features to block the blue rays coming from our handheld devices, computers, and fluorescent bulbs. This coating has several benefits and protecting our eyes from these harmful rays is one of them.

  • What causes myopia?

    Myopia is caused by a combination of heredity and environmental factors. Studies show that if we can move the focal point in front of the mid-peripheral retina we can slow the progression of myopia. The increased use of cell phones and computers, as well as less time outdoors, is probably a contributing factor.

  • Do I need an optometrist or an ophthalmologist?

    Both are eye doctors that diagnose and treat many of the same eye conditions. The American Optometric Association defines Doctors of Optometry as: primary health care professionals who examine, diagnose, treat and manage diseases and disorders of the visual system, the eye and associated structures as well as diagnose related systemic conditions. They prescribe glasses, contact lenses, low vision rehabilitation, vision therapy and medications as well as perform certain surgical procedures. The main difference between the two, is that ophthalmologists perform surgery, where an optometrist would not, preferring to specialize in eye examinations, as well as eyeglass and contact lens-related services. Optometrists would be involved in all of the pre-and post-operative care of these surgical patients; collecting accurate data, educating the patient, and insuring proper healing after the procedure. An ophthalmologist is more of a medical-related specialist, who would need only to be involved if some kind of surgery were being considered. An optometrist can treat most any eye conditions, including the use of topical or oral medications if needed. This might include the treatment of glaucoma, eye infections, allergic eye conditions, dry eyes and others, to name just a few. A third “O” that often is overlooked is the optician. An optician is not a doctor, and they cannot examine your eye under their own license. However, a highly trained optician plays an indispensable role in the most successful eye doctor’s offices. An optician most often handles the optical, contact lens, and glasses side of things. Based on their vast knowledge of lenses, lens technology and frames, they manufacture eyeglasses, as well as assist in the selection of eyewear based on the requirements of each individual patient.’

Could a Low-Carb Diet Reduce Your Risk of Glaucoma?

A recent eye care study points to a possible connection between carbs and preventing glaucoma.

Recently, an eye doctor at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) conducted a unique research study exploring the potential link between long-term dietary changes and preventing primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The study’s results indicated that if people at a high risk of developing glaucoma eat a diet that’s low in carbohydrates and high in fat and vegetable protein, they may lower their risk of this sight-threatening ocular disease by 20 percent. These results were published in Eye-Nature (July 22 issue).

Why are these results so significant?

Currently, glaucoma is the #1 cause of blindness in the United States, and primary open angle glaucoma is the most common type of this dangerous eye disease. Due mainly to elevated pressure levels inside the eye, POAG leads to optic nerve degeneration – causing vision loss.

Usually, patients experience no symptoms of POAG until the disease progresses, and visual problems motivate them to visit a nearby eye clinic for an eye exam. Regular eye exams by a qualified optometrist can detect the early signs of POAG way before vision loss occurs, but unfortunately, many people don’t visit an eye care provider until they notice a problem. In addition to routine eye exams, following a low carb diet may fortify people with another way to help prevent devastating vision loss.

How does the low carb diet affect eye health?

Eating foods that are low in carbohydrates and higher in fats and proteins causes the production of metabolites that are favorable for the optic nerve head, which is the specific site of damage in primary open angle glaucoma. Previous scientific studies have already linked this type of diet with positive effects on epilepsy, along with some promising results for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

While the low-carb diet cannot stop glaucoma progression in a patient who already has the disease, it may be a helpful way to prevent glaucoma in high-risk groups, such as people with a family history. Subsequently, the rate of vision loss due to glaucoma would be reduced.

Does a low-carb diet have the same effects as a ketogenic diet?

In the past, studies have demonstrated the protective effects that a ketogenic diet can have against neurologic disorders. (Ketogenic diets = extremely low-carb and higher-fat.). That’s because ketone bodies (energy compounds made by the body as it metabolizes fats) are used by the brain as a major energy source instead of glucose, and using more of these may enhance neurologic function and slow down neuronal degeneration. However, additional studies have shown that following a low-carb diet, not specifically ketogenic, may have similar properties for protecting against neurologic problems. And because a moderately low-carb diet is easier for most people to follow and doesn’t cause the same possible side effects of a ketogenic diet (e.g. headaches, abdominal issues, weakness, and irritability), it has been lauded as a more practical alternative.

How was the study on low-carb diets conducted?

The goal of the research study was to determine if following a low-carbohydrate diet for the long-term could have a positive impact on the optic nerve.

Your optic nerve transfers visual information from the retina to your brain, and it is located at the back of the eye. There is a large concentration of mitochondria (the major source of a cell’s energy supply) in the optic nerve. Because glaucoma is associated with dysfunctional mitochondria, researchers aimed to discover if substituting fat and proteins for carbohydrates would improve mitochondrial activity, preserve the function of the optic nerve, and prevent optic nerve degeneration in POAG (specifically, in a subtype of POAG with paracentral vision loss).

A large-scale study was formulated, involving 185,000 adults – female nurses and male health professionals between the ages of 40 – 75, between 1976 – 2017. Every two to four years, participants filled out questionnaires about what they ate and drank, as well as supplied information about their health condition. If they said they had glaucoma, the researchers followed up with their eye doctors to determine if they had POAG.

Data about the study’s participants was classified into three groups, based on how they achieved a low-carb diet:

  • Group 1 – Substituting animal-based fats and proteins instead of carbs
  • Group 2 – Substituting plant-based fats and proteins instead of carbs
  • Group 3 – Replacing carbs with high fats and proteins, regardless of the source

In the end, the results showed that people in Group 2 (increased plant-based fat and protein) were linked to a 20% lower risk of developing POAG compared to people who followed a high-carb diet. These findings suggest that vegetable sources may be beneficial than animal sources for a low-carb diet, with respect to lowering the risk of this subtype of open-angle glaucoma with paracentral vision loss.

What’s the take-home from this study?

First of all, eye doctors caution to remember that this was an observational study and not a clinical trial – so additional studies are needed to investigate the connection between dietary patterns and preventing POAG. Other issues, such as genetics, may also play a significant role. While it’s too early for optometrists to hang signs banning carbohydrates in their eye clinics, early findings do point to the eye care benefits of following a low-carb, plant-based diet. It’s time to stock up on legumes, avocados, nuts and tofu!

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Astigmatism, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Do I need Blue light lenses? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at Family Eye Care eye clinic near you in Old Bridge, New Jersey to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 732-393-8636

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

  • What exactly is glaucoma?

    Glaucoma is a condition in which the eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP) is too high. This means that your eye has too much aqueous humor in it, either because it produced too much, or because it’s not draining properly. Other symptoms are optic nerve damage and vision loss. Glaucoma is a silent disease that robs the patient of their peripheral vision. Early detection is very important.

  • How do I tell that I am developing glaucoma?

    The real tragedy behind vision-stealing glaucoma is that most people afflicted with this eye disease do not even realize they have it. As a result, the condition goes undiagnosed and untreated, which too often leads to unnecessary blindness. Of the 2.7 million people in the United States with glaucoma, half are undiagnosed. Most are lulled into a false sense of confidence because glaucoma often displays no symptoms in its early stages. By the time it begins to affect vision, any lost sight is impossible to regain. The risk of developing glaucoma begins to increase dramatically at midlife, which is why everyone should have a baseline exam by age 40. The most important concern is protecting your sight. Doctors look at many factors before making decisions about your treatment. If your condition is particularly difficult to diagnose or treat, you may be referred to a glaucoma specialist. While glaucoma is most common in middle-aged individuals, the disease can strike at any age, with those having a family history of the disease is especially vulnerable.

  • If one of my parents has glaucoma, does that mean I will develop it as well at some point?

    Having a parent with glaucoma does not mean that the child will automatically develop the condition too. However, those people with an immediate family history (parents, siblings) of glaucoma are at more risk to develop this disease. Patients should have a comprehensive eye examination each year to evaluate the health of the eyes and to look for signs of glaucoma. Some of these signs can be an increase in the pressure of the eyes as well as changes to the appearance of the optic nerve. Many times there are no symptoms noticed by the patient. If there is suspicion of glaucoma, more frequent visits to the eye doctor along with additional nerve testing are often required.

  • How often should I have my glasses prescription checked?

    Glaucoma is a condition in which the eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP) is too high. This means that your eye has too much aqueous humor in it, either because it produced too much, or because it’s not draining properly. Other symptoms are optic nerve damage and vision loss. Glaucoma is a silent disease that robs the patient of their peripheral vision. Early detection is very important.

Why Does Bono Always Wear His Signature Shades?

Ask our optometrist in Old Bridge how Do Sunglasses Help People With Glaucoma?

Ever wonder why rock superstar Bono wears sunglasses, even when indoors? It’s not due to his “look”, but rather is related to managing his glaucoma.

Ever wonder why Bono always wears shades, even when indoors? U2’s frontman doesn’t wear sunglasses simply as part of his image. Bono has had glaucoma, a build-up of pressure in the eyeball, which can damage the optic nerve and potentially lead to blindness if untreated—for over two decades now.

The real reason he wears his trademark shades is due to this progressive, sight-robbing eye disease, to protect his sensitive eyes from light and glare.

How Do Sunglasses Help People With Glaucoma?

People with glaucoma experience sensitivity to light (or photophobia) and glare, among other symptoms. When the sun is strong, those with this condition will be more affected by glare emanating from a variety of surfaces, like water, snow, sand or pavement, than the average person. Furthermore, certain glaucoma medications constrict the pupils, which can further contribute to acute sensitivity to glare and light, as well as redness and irritation.

That’s why people with glaucoma — and lots of people without glaucoma — feel best wearing sunglasses when outdoors on a sunny day, in a bright indoor space, or while driving in the early evening.

Here’s How You Can Protect Your Eyes

By wearing sunglasses that offer 100% UV protection, you can reduce your risk of developing sight robbing diseases, like cataracts and macular degeneration, and reduce glaucoma symptoms. Polarized lenses, in particular, can help with glare. With yearly comprehensive eye exams, early diagnosis and consistent treatment, you can prevent vision deterioration from glaucoma or similar sight-threatening eye diseases. Contact Family Eye Care in Old Bridge to book your eye doctor’s appointment today.

Book an eye exam at an eye clinic near you to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you.

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

Can glaucoma be cured?

While there is currently no cure for glaucoma, there are many effective treatment options available. Treatments that can help stop or slow the progression of glaucoma include eye drops, oral medications, as well as laser and surgical procedures.

How can glaucoma vision loss be prevented?

The best way to avoid glaucoma-related eyesight deterioration is to undergo regular eye exams, as glaucoma can be detected and treated even in its early stages, which can prevent significant vision loss or blindness. That’s why routine eye exams that include glaucoma testing are so important.

Old Bridge Digital Eye Strain relief.

Family Eye Care Rising Risks of Digital Eye Strain During Quarantine

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Myopia or Nearsightedness, Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Our Eye Doctor Shares Tips to Prevent Painful Computer Vision

You and your kids are staying home, practicing social distancing in order to reduce the potential spread of Covid-19. It’s certainly the responsible, safe thing to do. However, the current stay-at-home lifestyle has also led to people spending more time on digital devices. Screen time is dedicated to both work and leisure, which keeps everyone busy and entertained, but unfortunately, it has also led to a higher rate of digital eyestrain and other vision complications.

More people of all ages have been visiting our eye clinic complaining of uncomfortable or painful vision, and our optometrist regularly diagnoses digital eyestrain. To protect yourself from a range of annoying symptoms, read these eye care tips to prevent computer vision problems:

  • Pay attention to position

    When you sit down at your office desk, it’s probably equipped with ergonomic furniture and set at the perfect height. But your home workspace may not meet the same requirements. Take care to position your computer screen about an arm’s length and slightly beneath your line of vision. This will protect both your eyes from strain, as well as your posture and neck. Additionally, good back support will reduce discomfort caused by sitting for long periods. To reduce glare and accompanying eye fatigue, point your screen away from any bright lights.

  • Take coffee breaks

    Even if you’re not in the mood for another java, regular breaks to stand up and stretch are vital for your body and eyes! Get up and walk around your house a bit. Any activity that allows you to look away from your screen will give your body and eye muscles a well-needed respite.

  • Watch for warning signs

    In general, our eye doctor hears patients complain about the following computer vision symptoms when they visit our eye clinic:

    1. HeadachesWhen the pain is concentrated at the front of your head, it’s typically vision related. When it’s at the back of your head, it’s usually posture related. If your temples are throbbing, it’s probably tension.
    2. Neck and shoulder painThis is a direct result of a poorly positioned workspace. Your chair, screen, desk and keyboard all need to be aligned correctly for healthy posture.
    3. Blurry visionIf blinking clears up your sight, it could indicate a dry eye problem. But if your blurred vision usually occurs at the end of the day, it could point to mild farsightedness that’s being exacerbated by so many hours of close work.
    4. Dry eyesProlonged screen time leads to reduced blinking, which leaves your eyes exposed and compromises your moisturizing tear film. Burning or itching eyes are usual symptoms of dry eye syndrome.

    Computers can compromise children’s eye health

    During quarantine, kids depend heavily on digital devices for entertainment and socializing. There are no afternoon clubs or groups to attend, minimal opportunities to socialize, and education itself has become remote in most places. Computers are filling a range of roles in kids’ lives.

    While digital tech has been highly successful at keeping children occupied and happy, research also shows that kids who don’t spend time outdoors are at an increased risk for myopia (nearsightedness) and progressive myopia, especially if it runs in the family.

    During the pandemic, more and more parents are bringing their children to our eye care provider for eye exams. The most typical signs of a problem include:

    • Squinting at the TV or moving closer and closer to the screen
    • Headaches, particularly at the end of the day
    • Difficulty reading (when they didn’t have previous trouble)
    • Problems sleeping at night

    Tips from our optometrist

    • Practice the 20-20-20 rule for ocular health: every 20 minutes, look 20 feet into the distance for 20 seconds. This will help your eyes feel comfortable for longer.
    • Keep appropriate distance from screens: mobile phones should be about one foot from the face, desktops and laptops should be about two feet away, and TV screens should be about 10 feet away
    • Encourage kids to engage in physical activity outdoors, taking permitted walks or even kicking a ball around the backyard
    • Drink enough to stay hydrated
    • Remember to blink regularly
    • Don’t use digital devices within 2 hours of bedtime, so the blue light doesn’t disrupt your circadian rhythms

    Suffering from digital eye strain? Our eye doctor can help! Stop by our eye clinic to learn more about various strategies and products that can prevent and soothe the painful symptoms of computer vision.

    Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

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Why in an Eye Exam Essential for Diabetics (Old Bridge, NJ)

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Examination and Cares for individuals with Diabetes.

A Comprehensive Eye Examination can identify not only eye diseases, but diseases such as Diabetes and High Blood Pressure that affect the entire body. It is obvious that an eye examination can identify eye diseases such as Myopia or Nearsightedness, Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration, or Dry eye. Diabetic Retinopathy and Hypertensive Retinopathy are changes in the retina due to those disease.

In the US 1 out of every 10 people has diabetes, and unfortunately the numbers are going up. Diabetes affect the eyes, and at times, an eye examination is the first point that Diabetes mad be identified or suspected. Diabetes, especially when uncontrolled, affects blood vessels and nerves throughout the entire body. Excess blood sugar damages tiny blood vessels in the retina, which can lead to ocular inflammation, bleeding and devastating vision loss when left untreated.

The most common types of eye diseases associated with diabetes are:

  • Diabetic retinopathy – small blood vessels in the retina weaken and sometimes leak blood
  • Glaucoma – elevated pressure levels of fluid in the eye
  • Cataracts – a clouding of the eye’s lens that blurs vision

There are two main types of Diabetes: Type one, known as Juvenile Onset Diabetes, and Type 2, Adult Onset Diabetes. A A yearly eye examination is critical to preserve your health and maintain clear sight. The Optomap instrument takes a picture of the retina, and a dilated eye exam enables us to see he retina directly. Dr. Roth can point out changes that are occurring in your retina and the picture enables us to monitor changes over time.

Unfortunately, about 60% of people who have diabetes, do not seek the care of an eye doctor. Sight-threatening changes in the inner eye tissues are often missed. Only a diabetic eye exam can reliably detect or rule out the start of many dangerous eye conditions. In addition, when we identify changes in your eye health, that may be an indicator that the total body treatment may require a change.

Emergency Visits for individuals with Diabetes are sometimes needed.

In addition to an annual examination, it is important that you are aware of the following symptoms:

  • Seeing spots or floaters or small black lines or spots that don’t glide away
  • Seeing red tinted fog
  • Sudden changes in your vision
  • Taking longer than usual to adjust to darkness

Please consider calling our office, Family Eye Care in Old Bridge and schedule a time for a comprehensive eye examination.

You can schedule an appointment on line by clicking here: CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Old Bridge, New Jersey | 6 Actions You Can Take to Prevent Cancer

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Nowadays, cancer is so widespread that most people have faced it – either directly or indirectly through the diagnosis of a friend or family member. However, despite the grim picture cancer statistics have presented over the years, scientists have also made tremendous strides towards understanding the biology of cancer cells. Medicine has reached many breakthroughs that improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Myopia or Nearsightedness, Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Old Bridge eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Local Eye clinic near you in Old Bridge, New Jersey

Is there anything to do other than wait for new research results? Yes, there are ways to protect yourself against cancer. Our eye care specialist outlines the following ways to take action and protect your health:

  1. Visit your eye doctor for regular eye exams
    The vast majority of people don’t get around to visiting their eye doctor unless they notice a problem. However, eye exams are extremely valuable for reasons that go way beyond basic eye care services. When your eye doctor performs a comprehensive dilated eye exam, he or she can spot the early signs of eye cancer – which is typically asymptomatic. While eye cancer is rare, it does occur and can appear at any age. The good news is that most eye cancer is highly treatable when diagnosed early.
  2. Prevention goes far
    Taking advantage of preventive healthcare is a powerful way to stay safe. That means going to yearly wellness exams and following your physician’s instructions for cancer screenings, such as a colonoscopy. This the best proven way to prevent cancer and catch it at a very early stage, when treatment is easiest. Self-exams for lumps and suspicious moles or skin lesions are also effective ways to improve early detection.
  3. Don’t neglect your dental exams
    Who likes going to the dentist? Almost nobody… And some people dread it so strongly that they’ll avoid the dentist until their tooth pain becomes unbearable. Yet, good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist will not only help your smile look nicer, but they could also help prevent cancer too.

    Research suggests that compromised oral health is associated with the development of cancer. In sum, even if you can’t stand the dentist – this is a time to grit your teeth and get regular dental exams!

  4. Live healthy
    Paying attention to proper nutrition (eat an abundance of vitamin-rich fruits and vegetables) and incorporating physical activity into your days are both excellent ways to promote your lasting health. Not smoking and not drinking excessive alcohol (binge drinking is particularly bad for you) are essential behaviors for helping to prevent certain types of cancers. Obesity is another risk factor for developing specific cancers.
  5. Don’t take risks
    Sometimes, it’s the little things that increase your risk of cancer, such as spending too much time in the sun without protection and having too many sexual partners.

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, and it’s also the most preventable! Avoiding tanning beds or sun lamps, covering up during the sunniest times of day, and wearing enough sunscreen to block UV rays can all prevent skin cancer.

    In addition, the more sexual partners you have – the higher your risk for developing HIV, AIDS, or HPV, all conditions that raise your chances for particular cancers.

  6. Avoid occupational hazards
    If you work in an industrial environment, make sure you are well-protected against industrial and environmental toxins, such as benzene, asbestos fibers, aromatic amines, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). But don’t fret over your proximity to electromagnetic radiation from high-voltage power lines or radiofrequency radiation from cell phones and microwaves; these types of exposure have not been found to cause cancer.

We’re here to help you stay safe and make the most of your health. Using the latest technologies, our eye doctor performs comprehensive eye exams as a part of our expert eye care services. Visit our eye care center near you for more tips on how to optimize your vision and your overall health!

Family Eye Care, your Old Bridge eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

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