Skip to main content

Our COVID protocols | Telemedicine / Teletherapy

Patient Forms
Request Appointment
Home »

glasses

6 Signs You May Need Glasses

Many people don’t realize they have a vision problem. Perhaps they’ve gone years without glasses and haven’t noticed the gradual change in their vision. Or they’ve noticed a change, but put off a visit to an eye doctor. Regardless of whether you’re experiencing problems, make an appointment with Dr. Moshe Roth to maintain your eye health. 

 

There are many clues that your eyesight needs correcting, such as struggling to read up close, or having trouble seeing street signs, or barely deciphering faces while watching a film. If you’re still not sure you need glasses, consider these 6 questions. 

 

Are You Frequently Squinting and/or Experiencing Headaches? 

 

Unless it’s unusually bright, there’s no reason to be squinting if your vision is clear. Although squinting may briefly enhance your eyes’ ability to focus, if done for too long it can tax your  eyes and surrounding muscles, which can result in frequent headaches. 

 

If you have to squint while working on your computer or using digital devices, you may be experiencing not only headaches but also digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome. The cure is often a pair of computer glasses, or blue light glasses, which are designed to block out or filter blue light. This can reduce headaches and squinting when using your digital devices. 

 

Are You Struggling to See Up Close? 

 

If the texts on your phone or restaurant menu look blurry, you may be farsighted. While reading glasses are a great option for near tasks, you’ll need to take them off for other activities.  Consider getting progressive lenses, which change gradually from point to point on the lens, providing the exact lens power needed for seeing objects clearly at any distance. Progressive lenses help you comfortably see near, far, and in-between all day long. 

 

Do You Struggle to See Things at a Distance?  

 

If you’re having difficulty seeing objects at a distance, you may be myopic (nearsighted).  Myopia is the most common cause of impaired vision in children and young adults. Consider a pair of glasses with high-index lenses, which are thinner and lighter than other lenses, along with anti-reflective coating. 

 

Do You Have Blurred Vision at Night?  

 

Are objects or signs more blurry at night? Do you experience halos or glare around lights while driving at night? These may be symptoms of a vision issue, such as myopia — though they can also be attributed to more serious ocular conditions, such as cataracts and glaucoma. To know the cause, get your eyes properly evaluated by Dr. Moshe Roth. 

 

If determined that it is indeed myopia, consider getting prescription glasses with anti-glare or anti-reflective (AR) coating, as they allow more light in and also cut down on glare. This can dramatically improve night vision and help you see more clearly when driving at night. 

 

Are You Experiencing Double Vision?

 

If you’ve been experiencing double vision, contact Dr. Moshe Roth, who will get to the root of the problem and provide you with a diagnosis. Double vision may be due to crossed eyes (strabismus), or a corneal irregularity, such as keratoconus, or another medical condition.

 

If you are diagnosed with any of these, you’ll likely need a pair of glasses with a prism correction that helps correct alignment issues. Special lenses prevent you from seeing double by combining two images into a single one.

 

However, note that if you experience sudden double vision, it may be a medical emergency that should be checked by an eye doctor immediately.

 

Are You Losing Your Place or Using Your Finger When Reading? 

 

If you’re frequently losing your spot or skipping lines when reading, you may have a vision problem. This could be due to strabismus, lazy eye, or astigmatism. 

 

The Importance of Regular Eye Exams

 

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, it is essential to have a highly qualified optometrist examine your eyes to assess your vision and check for any eye diseases — and to do so as soon as possible. This is the only way to determine whether you need glasses or if something else is causing the problem. 

 

Even if you’re not experiencing any symptoms, it’s important to routinely get your eyes checked. Many eye diseases can be effectively treated before you notice major problems, so regular eye exams are important to maintain eye health. Contact Family Eye Care in Old Bridge to make an appointment with Dr. Moshe Roth. The sooner you get your vision checked, the faster you’ll be able to see clearly and enjoy a higher quality of life. 

Coronavirus and Your Eyes – What You Should Know

As coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads around the world, and specifically in our area in New Jersey, health professionals advise that we limit our risk of contracting the virus by:

  1. thoroughly washing our hands,
  2. practicing social distancing, and
  3. not touching our face:  nose, mouth, or eyes

Your eyes actually play an important role in spreading COVID-19. 

Coronavirus is transmitted through droplets when an infected person sneezes or coughs. These droplets can easily enter your body through the mucous membranes on your face, such as your nose, mouth, and your eyes. 

What Is Coronavirus?

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is a virus that causes mild to severe respiratory illness associated with fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. Symptoms typically appear within 2 weeks of exposure. Those with acute cases of the virus can develop pneumonia and other life-threatening complications. 

What you should know?

Guard Your Eyes Against COVID-19 

  • Avoid rubbing your eyes. It is very common for us to touch our face and our eyes. If you absolutely must, first wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 
  • Tears carry the virus. Touching tears or a surface where tears have fallen can spread coronavirus. Make sure to wash your hands after touching your eyes and throughout the day as well.
  • Disinfect surfaces. You can contract COVID-19 by touching an object or surface that has the virus on it, such as a door knob, and then touching your eyes. 

Coronavirus and Pink Eye

Pink eye, (conjunctivitis) is an inflammation of the the clear membrane that covers the white of the eye. Conjunctivitis is characterized by red, watery, and itchy eyes. Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread by coughing and sneezing, too.

A recent study indicates that viral conjunctivitis may be a symptom of COVID-19. The study found conjunctival injection (redness) occurs in about 1 out of every 100 people who have coronavirus. 

If you suspect you have pink eye, call us: Family Eye Care in Old Bridge, NJ.  Please call us before coming in so we can assess your condition and adequately prepare for your visit.

Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

If you usually wear contact lenses, it may be a good idea to use eyeglasses during this time, in order to lower your risk of being infected with coronavirus.  Wearing glasses may provide an extra layer of protection. The infected droplets will hit the lens of your eyeglasses rather than going into your eye. Eyeglasses will obviously not protect you if the virus reaches your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms around your frames. Unlike specialized safety goggles, glasses are not considered a safe way to prevent coronavirus.

Contact Lenses and COVID-19

If you wear contact lenses, it is a good idea to wash your hands well before inserting or removing your lenses. 

Clean your Eyeglasses Regularly 

Some viruses can remain on a hard surfaces for hours to days. This can then be transmitted to your fingers and then to your face. People who wear reading glasses should be even more careful, because they usually handle their glasses more often throughout the day.  As you are probably aware, older individuals tend to be more vulnerable to COVID-19.  Wash the lenses and frames with warm water and soap, and dry your eyeglasses using a microfiber cloth. 

If you take Eye Medicine…

It is a good idea to make sure you have enough of all medications, including eye medications for glaucoma for example, just in case you need to be quarantined or if supplies run short. This may not be possible for everyone due to insurance limitations. If you cannot pre-order, then make sure to request a refill as soon as you’re due. It is never a good idea to wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 

Digital Devices and Eyestrain

At times like this, we all tend to use digital devices even more.  Take note if your eyes become tired, or sore, or if you have blurry vision.  Double vision or headaches are symptoms of computer vision syndrome.  This can become particularly noticeable when your visual system is overworked, when using computers or other digital devices.  It might indicate a need for a new prescription in the near future. Many patients benefit from the use of special eyeglasses that are designed specifically for those who spend a lot of time on computer. 

Children and Digital Devices

As children are now not in school, they may end up spending even more screen-time than usual.  They may be using computers, tablets and smartphones more, and for longer amounts of time.  Computer vision syndrome, mentioned above, can affect children as well. We recommend limiting screen time to a maximum of 2 hours per day for children, though it’s understandably difficult to control under the circumstances. 

A good rule of thumb is the 20-20-20 rule, especially in this year of 2020. 

For every 20 minutes that you are on computer, look at a distance object that is at least 20 feet away, for at least 20 seconds.

It is a good idea to stop all screen time for at least 60 minutes before sleep. You and your child will sleep better. 

Children and Outdoor Play

For good visual development, it is a good idea to spend at least 1-2 hours a day outside.

We, at Family Eye Care, in Old Bridge NJ, wish you good health and hope you stay safe. 

How to Keep Glasses from Getting Foggy

Whether you live in a cold climate or have visited one in the winter, you have probably seen someone who just walked in from the cold outdoors sporting glasses that are no longer transparent, or perhaps you’ve experienced it yourself.

Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

There are several factors that cause your glasses to fog up — one of which is ambient heat, in other words, the actual temperature in your surrounding environment. Eyelashes that touch the lens can cause fogging, as well as tight-fitting frames that touch the cheeks (many plastic frames cause this problem), which impede proper airflow. Lastly, high humidity and the sweat and moisture that accompany overexertion/ exercise can also trigger foggy lenses. 

Ultimately, glasses cloud over due to moisture in the air condensing on the cold surface of your lenses. 

Now that you know the most common reasons why your glasses fog up, it’s time to read about some possible solutions. Below are a few tips to help keep your lenses clear year-round.

6 Tips to Steer Clear of Cloudy Specs 

1. Invest in Anti-Fog Coating

Anti-fog coating blocks out moisture that would normally stick to your lenses, by creating a surface layer that repels water and mist. An optician applies the treatment to both sides of the lens in order to prevent fogging so you can see clearly in any climate or environment.

Ask us about our proven anti-fog treatment for your glasses and be on your way to clearer vision, all the time.

2. Use Anti-Fog Wipes, Sprays, or Creams

Commercial anti-fog products are an alternative to lens coatings. These products, typically sold in either gel or spray form, are specially designed to prevent condensation and moisture from building up on your lenses. Apply the product as directed on the packaging and remove it with the supplied cloth, wipe or towelette. If a cloth wasn’t included in the box, use a scratch-free cloth.

Aside from the gel or spray, you can use anti-fog wipes. These pre-treated napkins are perfect for those who are on the go. 

3. Move Your Glasses Further Away from Your Face

Eyeglasses tend to trap moisture and heat, particularly if they are positioned close to your eyes or face, which increases the buildup of fog on your lenses. Consider adjusting the position of your eyewear by pushing your glasses slightly further down your nose. It will stimulate proper air circulation, thereby reducing fog accumulation.

4. Wear Your Seasonal Accessories Wisely

If the weather cools down, try not to wear too many layers, to prevent overheating and producing sweat, which can make your glasses to fog up more. Wear only the necessary amount of clothing to stay warm. If you’re wearing a scarf, consider one with an open weave or a more breathable material to let the air pass through. 

5. Avoid Abrupt Temperature Changes

Allow your eyewear to acclimate to changes in temperature. If you are moving from an environment that is cold into one which is warm and humid, try to let your glasses adjust accordingly. 

For instance: 

  • As you enter a building, stand in the doorway for a minute or two as the temperature slowly transitions from cool to warm. 
  • When in the car, gradually adjust the heat, particularly when your hands aren’t free to simply remove your glasses and wipe off the fog.

Fogged up glasses are not only irritating but can also be dangerous, especially for those who drive, ski, or operate machinery. So make sure to take the necessary precautions, especially as the weather changes. 

6. Swap Glasses for Contact Lenses

If contacts are an option for you, you might want to wear them on those cold days, to avoid foggy glasses syndrome (yeah, that’s a made-up term).

 

Want to keep your glasses from fogging up? Speak with Dr. Moshe Roth. At Family Eye Care in Old Bridge, we can advise you about a variety of contact lenses, anti-fog treatment and other solutions to help you see clearly— any day.