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What Exactly is an Eye Chart?

At some point in our lives, we've all had our eyes examined using an eye chart – whether during a school screening or at the optometrist's office. But what exactly is the chart and what does it measure? Read on to find out!

The Link Between Dry Eyes and Depression

Depression is an illness that can affect every aspect of a person’s life, including the eyes. Researchers are currently investigating whether depression can cause dry eye symptoms.

Bloodshot Eyes – Should You Be Concerned?

Bloodshot eyes can be harmless, but may also be a sign of an underlying eye condition.

Are Myopic Parents More Likely to Have Myopic Children?

Can you pass myopia, or nearsightedness, onto your kids? According to research, there is definitely a genetic component. Fortunately, myopia management can slow myopia progression.

Does Your Child Have 20/20 Vision Yet Still Struggles In School?

Your child's eyesight may be excellent but have subpar visual skills that keep them from reaching their potential. Vision therapy can improve visual skills and boost your child’s performance in school and in sports.

Concerned About Macular Degeneration? – Here Are 6 Tips to Lower your Risk

What Is Macular Degeneration? Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration of the macula, the key part of the retina responsible for highly detailed vision and central vision. There are two main types of macular degeneration: dry and wet. Dry AMD occurs when small deposits in the macula called drusen...

Can Your Vision Change After a Concussion?

A blow to the head can badly disrupt the connection between your brain and your eyes and cause problems like blurry or double vision and sensitivity to light. Fortunately, a neuro-optometrist can treat your concussion-related visual symptoms.

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

In people with certain eye conditions, regular contact lenses may be uncomfortable—even impossible— to wear. Here's why scleral lenses may be a better option.

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Scleral contact lenses are tailor-made for people with keratoconus, irregularly shaped corneas and severe dry eyes, as well as patients recovering from certain eye surgeries. But did you know that they’re also ideal for people who live active lifestyles?

5 Ways to Reduce Your Child’s Screen Time

If your child spends too much time in front of screens, it’s important to set limits and establish routines to protect both their general health and their eye health and help prevent the development or progression of myopia.

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